Facts About Working In Switzerland


Permits

As Switzerland is not an EU member state, all non-Swiss nationals need a permit in order to work in this country. Since the bilateral agreement on the freedom of movement between the EU and Switzerland (Freiz├╝gigkeitsabkommen FZA) came into effect, it has become much easier for EU citizens to enter the Swiss job market. Obtaining such work permits on your behalf is part of the service provided by ITech Consult. Find out more…

National Taxes

Compared to the other European countries, taxes in Switzerland are rather low. Switzerland, however, is a federal country. Therefore, the amount of taxes depends on the canton you live in. For holders of permits L, L-EU, B and B-EU, taxes are deducted directly from the wages. Find out more…

Social Security Contributions

When you work in Switzerland, you are required to pay certain taxes as well as contributions to national social security funds. These include old-age insurance (Altersvorsorge AHV), the national pension fund (Pensionskasse), accident insurance, unemployment insurance and health insurance. The Swiss social system focusses on security and requires contributions to provide for all contingencies. Except for health insurance, all social security contributions are deducted directly from the wages. Find out more…

Blog For Our Candidates

In our blog for IT specialists, you will find further information about the subject in general as well as updates on important news about working in Switzerland. Take a look yourself and get the latest updates on current news – or ask questions and read our answers in this blog.

Sample Calculation

If you have never worked as a freelancer before or are not yet working in Switzerland, it might be quite difficult to estimate the costs and social security contributions you will be facing in our country. Our sample calculation has been designed to give you a first overview. Find out more…